Soul Writing

“Your writing voice is the deepest possible reflection of who you are. The job of your voice is not to seduce or flatter or make well-shaped sentences. In your voice, your readers should be able to hear the contents of your mind, your heart, your soul.” — Meg Rosoff

(Art by Julia Inglis.)

From Salter

“In the end, writing is like a prison, an island from which you will never be released but which is a kind of paradise: the solitude, the thoughts, the incredible joy of putting into words the essence of what you for the moment understand and with your whole heart want to believe.”

viaCounterpointPress

via Counterpoint Press

I didn’t mean to write about him, even think about him. —He was a hero of mine until I came to realize some things: what I really liked was the prose. Some of it just breathtaking. It was not about the plot or the story. And he died too late to circumvent the last novel. I don’t know if the prose came to life further into All That Is, I turned away before I could say one way or another. And he personally failed me. (I always take my writers personally.) — But I happened across “Why I Write” in Lit Hub and so I came to be here once more. So there’s the quote and there’s the photo, of a much younger Salter than the one we buried. Indeed. It is for the moment what you understand, and believe.

Bridges & Arcs

Photo from La Crosse Tribune MacGilvray road, outside La Crosse

There is something about bridges. Alone, symbolic, creating a path to another shore. Who knows what will be found there? It’s the mystery and the answer together. Any type of bridge, crossing a river, stream, lake… Any size: huge, small, and “one car at a time” for the single road.

Arcs carry their own beauty. Someone called an arc the most perfect shape in nature. Why? Half a moon—beginning and end together? The alpha and the omega in one view. From the side— especially above water where you can see the reflection—you see the whole. The light and the dark sides. The coming together of everything. Thinking of it, there’s the arc from life to death. There’s the arc of the short story. (Try writing one without an arc.) The arc of a marriage?

And here we have the bridge and the arc together. Mmmmmmmm…what thoughts can we merge?

 

Interesting Literature

I found a new (to me) bookish website:  https://interestingliterature.com

My first attraction is the article on “22 Interesting Facts about Writing.” So I’ll be checking it out for a while. After all, to us bookies what is more interesting than things about writing or writing or reading or reading about writing? And today I just learned that my pal,  Friedrich Nietzsche was the first philosopher to ‘write’ on a typewriter. What a trend setter he was!

fountain-pen-writing

Posted on Facebook by Interesting Literature

And So…

“There is nothing to writing. All you do is sit down at a typewriter and bleed.” ― Ernest Hemingway

∞  About that infinity sign.

A few years back, an overheard conversation by the copier: “So how do I get it to keep printing?” “No problem, just hit that upside down 8.” “It’s not upside down. It’s on its side.”